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Michael Bak Ph.D. Senior Engineering Manager

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Dr. Michael Bak brings over 30 years of experience in performing and managing all phases of mechanical engineering consulting projects. His expertise includes: finite element theory, linear and nonlinear structural analysis, heat transfer analysis, composite life prediction, fracture mechanics, computer programming, and applied mathematics. In addition, Mike teaches CAE Associates' full lineup of ANSYS training seminars, and provides hotline ANSYS support to our customers. Mike develops and teaches engineering courses as an adjunct professor and lecturer at Rensselaer in Hartford and Central Connecticut State University.


Outside of the office, Mike enjoys running, kayaking and working in his robust vegetable garden.

Education

Ph.D., Applied Mechanics, University of Connecticut

Master of Science, Structural Engineering and Structural Mechanics, University of California at Berkeley

Bachelor of Science, Civil Engineering, Lehigh University
 

Recent Posts:

November 22, 2016

Of all the different types of finite element models I have created, some of the most challenging have been laminated fiber-reinforced composite structures. Composite structures have excellent strength to weight ratios and are used in many applications, including most of the airframe in modern aircraft as shown in Figure 1 (above).

However, there are significant and obvious complicating features when trying to perform structural analysis of these structures:

September 13, 2016

If you perform nonlinear structural finite element analyses with large displacements, then you are probably very familiar with the “element has become highly distorted”, or similar, warning message. This warning indicates that due to excessive deflections, the shape of the elements in the mesh have significantly changed from their original shape, and this distortion is reducing simulation accuracy and causing convergence issues, eventually leading to analysis termination.