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Most Read Posts of 2016!

August 2, 2016 By: Christina Capasso Jamerson

The engineers at CAE Associates enjoy bringing you educational, informative blog posts each week. This week, we are reflecting back on the year so far and want to share the Top 5 Most Read posts of 2016. Take a moment to be sure you've viewed them all!

1) 2D or not 2D? That is Often the FEA Modeling Question

Two-D, or not Two-D: that is the question: Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous CPU time from 3D analyses; or to take arms against a sea of data, and by opposing, gain valuable results in a short period of time with a 2D simulation...

2) Mean Stress Corrections in Fatigue

An important topic in fatigue is accounting for the effect of non-zero mean stress.Mean stress is equal to the average of the maximum and minimum stress during a fatigue load cycle...

3) Tips & Tricks for FEA Modeling of Rubber and Elastomers - Part 1

Are you having problems solving a detailed stress analysis of an O-ring or seal? This post provides a series of tips for enhancing the accuracy and convergence of your simulation...

4) Tips & Tricks for FEA Modeling of Rubber and Elastomers - Part 2

In Part 1, three tips to consider when solving a detailed stress analysis of an O-ring or seal, including: material testing, material law selection, and testing of the selected material law were discussed.  In this post, here are more great tips for enhancing the accuracy and convergence of your simulation...

5) Understanding Geometric Nonlinearities

When performing structural finite element analysis (FEA), there are three types of nonlinearities that the analyst needs to consider including in their simulation. Material nonlinearities are needed to predict plastic strains in metallic parts, cracking or crushing of concrete, or extreme deformation of plastic or rubber materials.  Contact nonlinearities are required to predict change in status and/or sliding friction between assembly parts. The third option, geometric nonlinearity, involves a few different concepts and it is not always easy to identify when it is required...